Revenue Leakage

Revenue Leakage

Two words that you really don’t like to see in the same sentence is “Revenue” and “Leakage”. This is a polite way of saying money that you should have been earning that you really aren’t. I have conversations with people day in and day out that revolves around how to stop the leakage and make more money….so what I have learned over the years.

Revenue leakage comes in many, many forms. It could be that the domains aren’t installed correctly at a parking company or they’ve been moved out of your account at a parking company (this happens a lot). The nameservers aren’t set correctly or cNames aren’t up to date if you are using a rotation service.

The most obvious revenue leakage is forgetting to add your W8/W9 tax form or even your bank details to your parking account. I don’t know how many times I’ve received an email from a person accusing me of taking their money and not paying them. I check their account and they’ve forgotten to provide bank details. Their tone usually changes dramatically at that point.

Escrow.com

Another form of revenue leakage is not actually knowing what you own. The problem with domains is that they’re just so easy to forget about, drop and then lose. We had a client that had their domains littered across about fifty registrars and they had no idea what was going on. They asked for our help and over the next year we aggregated the domains into a single registrar, locked them down and saved them a fortune.

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Saturday Musings – You’re not going to believe what happened…

Saturday Musings – You’re not going to believe what happened…

Just over a week ago I’d published an article, went to bed and enjoyed the peace that only comes when everything seems to be good. The next morning I awoke to discover that two things had happened in a perfect storm.

The first was that my personal server had been hacked and with laser precision all of my websites, backups, configuration files and system had been eradicated. Trust me when I say that I had a LOT of protections in place but seriously, this was like a guided missile.

Escrow

The second thing that happened was that the primary hard drive in my server began to fail. I say began to because sometimes it was there and sometimes it wasn’t. I have a second physical hard disk in my server that I keep all my backups on and that was working just fine except this was hit by the hackers.

Some people have asked me about offsite backups and I answer this in two ways. It’s a personal server….and have you ever had to restore a 500 Gig backup over the wire from your home? It will take about 3 weeks just to transmit the data. Needless to say, I’m exploring “other options”.

So what was the end result of all of this? I lost everything on my blog from about February onwards. I would like to apologise to all of you that have signed up and have to do so again…..sorry about that. I would like to appeal to anyone that has any of the articles on either the “Domain Association” OR “Selling high value domains” as I would love to get them back up as I think that they were really ground breaking.

So what else have I done? I’ve reworked the site, updated the look and feel and I’m in the process of adding a lot more features. Despite the amount of work involved I’ve had a lot of fun rebuilding Whizzbang’s blog from scratch. I’ve also enjoyed learning about security, setting mail servers, database integrity, apache and PHP configurations. There’s nothing like getting your hands back on the tools. :-)

So thank-you to everyone that has been patient with me over the past ten days. If you notice anything not working then please let me know. In particular I would like to thank all of the sponsors. Each of you have been outstanding in your support.

Right now, I think that I’m going to take a rest and get back to finishing my science fiction novel…..it’s up to the fifth rewrite!

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A Domain Name Association - part 6

I had an interesting question in one of the forums about the topic of a domain industry association. The question was, 'Why is Michael doing this?' This question really caused me to think why I was spending time thinking about a domain association and it justified an answer.

I looked at the two associations (thedna.org and ICA) and it was clear to me that they really didn't represent the interests of the typical domain owner in any way. For a start I have a real problem with any association where board seats can effectively be purchased. This is fine for companies where profit is the motive but in my opinion it is not OK for an association.

If an association is to truly represent members then EVERYONE needs to have an opportunity for a board seat....hence the concept of classes of members and an allocation of board seats per class that individuals could potentially win via an election in their class.

There also needed to be different fees per class (hence the financially modelling at the end of the presentation). The great majority of domain investors aren't able to afford $5K/year but many would put up their hand for $250/year.

Given the challenges I saw with the current associations I wanted to push the discussion forward in such a manner that it at least reached the two associations and a dialogue established at the domain investor level. So where am I at with my goals?

 

1. The ICA was represented by Andee Hill in the webinar (she is not a director of the ICA). The other directors of the ICA are trying to work out when they are able to jump on a call with me.....I think that many of them have been on vacation.
2. I have been contacted by the chairman of thedna.org and he is connecting me with the CEO. They are completely open to everything to embracing domain investors. This includes changing their constitution to ensure that domain investors have representation at the board level. It was actually a refreshing conversation with the chairman.

I find that the bigger challenge is to engage the domain investment community themselves. What has surprised me is the general apathy towards both associations and the discussion itself. There appears to be a disconnect in the VALUE provided by either association for domain investors. This could be a function of us tending to be "lone wolves" but I actually don't believe this is the cas e as domain communities do exist. Fundamentally I believe that both associations have failed to prove their value.....and more importantly for me.......I've failed in someway to proactively engage the community as well.

For example, out of the whole industry about 9 people said they would attend the webinar.....6 turned up. I've run webinars before on topics such as selling domains and had 18 people say they would turn up and 18 did. Just for the record I think that anything over about 15 people can become quite unwieldy. What's interesting is that over 500 people have read each of the articles in the series on "A domain association". This tells me that the topic is important to people but they aren't willing to engage as yet.

I would be interested to know if I am interpreting this correctly. I would also like any ideas on how we, as a community, can engage more effectively on the topic. Or, maybe we shouldn't and just let the chips fall where they fall . Should I run another webinar? Is the time wrong etc. Any feedback would be well received.....can't promise that I can do something but I would like to do my best and try.

I liked the picture of the key for this article as it has two sides to it. If only one side was present then the key wouldn't work. What we really need is for domain investors to speak to complete their side of the key and get their point of view across to the associations.......and myself for that matter. It's through an engaging dialogue that a better outcome for us all can be achieved.

I look forward to your feedback and comments.

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Domain Association - Part 5

The reason why most people do not join an association is that they don’t clearly perceive what the benefits are for them. We could leave it as, “I feel all good about myself being part of an association” but that doesn’t really cut it from a business perspective.

So why would anyone join a domain industry association?

  1. An association can fight the fights that you just can’t fight yourself.For example, let’s imagine that a domainer found that a registrar was jumping the gun and changing the nameservers on domains prior to them expiring.  The risk for the domainer is that could be “punished” by the registrar if they kick up a fuss…..while if the association had a code of conduct for registrar’s then this issue could be addressed.
  2. There are many fights that you just don’t know about.Whether it be price increases on domains, changes to the UDRP process or net neutrality and liability. There are many issues that actually impact the domain investment industry that as individual domain owners we have little to no say over while as an association we could have a voice.
  3. More confidence in dealing with people of at least some integrity.If there is a “seal” of approval that can be applied to businesses and individuals that agree to abide by a code of conduct then it would provide external buyers/sellers with more confidence that they are working with “good” businesses. Anyone that knowingly transgresses the code could be “punished” by have the right to use the “seal” taken away from them.

    I personally believe that the fastest way that we can all increase the value of our domain portfolios is to behave in a transparent and ethical manner. If an investment firm is wanting to invest $100m in the domain industry then they need to have confidence that they are dealing with people of good standing. Having a “seal” doesn’t solve the problem but it heads us all in the right direction.

There are many other reasons why joining a domain industry association would be beneficial to your businesses. I’m sure that as it expanded there could be deals cut with conferences, parking companies and registrars for association members that would largely offset the cost of any fees…..but that is a little ways down the track.

I’ve had a number of people say that if a person they didn’t like was in the association then they wouldn’t have anything to do with it. Just consider where this line of thinking leads. If everyone thought this way then no one would be in the association because there is ALWAYS someone that has offended you in the past.

On the other hand, if a person is in the association and they agree to abide by a code then their behaviour will need to change or they are evicted. One is backward looking (I was hurt in the past by them) and the other is forward looking (give them a second chance but they must change).

Other people have suggested to me that there are too many different and conflicting issues for a single association to handle. I actually disagree with this. The reason being is that the structure I proposed in an earlier article suggests the application of taskforces that are formed and disbanded as issues arise and are dealt with. There can be as many taskforces that are necessary to deal with the multitude of issues…..all it proves is that an association is really necessary to deal with them all.

Conflicting issues are ultimately addressed by the board and each constituency has an equal say at that level of the association. Remember that the board is charged with the task of expanding the domain industry.
In my time as vice-chairman of the Australian Internet Industry Association there were many times that individual directors were in commercial conflict with one another. The challenge for the board was to always focus on what is best for the industry and not just a particular member.

I hope that you have found the series on a “Domain Industry Association” interesting and thought provoking. I’ve had a LOT of feedback via email…..feel free to leave your own public comments as well.

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Michael Gilmour has been in business for over 32 years and has both a BSC in Electronics and Computer Science and an MBA. He is the former vice-chairman of the Internet Industry Association in Australia and is in demand as a speaker at Internet conferences the world over. Michael is passionate about working with online entrepreneurs to help them navigate their new ventures around the many pitfalls that all businesses face.
Click here to arrange time with Michael

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A Domain Name Association - part 4

Funding the Association

To be effective the association must have both a representative membership base and also the funds to fulfil the vision and direction provided by the board. There is little point in running an association that either prices itself out of its market or does not have the buy-in of the wider industry at large.

The proposed fee structure is to be based upon the Class and category of membership. Annual membership fees range from as low as $250 for a small individual domain owner doing less than $10K in sales per year up to $25K for a large company doing in excess of $5m in revenue.

By having the annual fees linked to a Class and category (eg. A, B or C) of membership means that the association is affordable to the broad spectrum of the industry. From the previous article I indicated that the members within each of the categories can also nominate for board election to represent their constituency.

There are four major areas of the cashflow.
1.    Drivers – new members and total number of members.
2.    Income from membership fees – other potential incomes have been ignored.
3.    Expenses -  what it will cost to run a lean business with a reasonable CEO package.
4.    Profit and cashflow – results if the targets specified from the above are met.

The drivers outline the targets that the new CEO and board for that matter need to reach in terms of new members by category. After the initial push of gaining 41 members a typical month will mean 10 new members each month for the following 12 months. This will provide near enough to 150 members in the association by the end of 12 months. This does not count the “free” members from the “general user” category that would essentially sign-up for a newsletter.

The above drivers and fees then translate through to the income line of the association.


Finally, the expense are calculated and a monthly profit and cashflow is derived.



As can be seen from the cashflow the lowest point is around $90K positive and by the end of the 12 months there should be near enough to $120K in the bank. The total revenue for the association is $406K with $287K in expenses. This will fund a CEO and membership assistant plus allow ample funds for marketing and traveling to the various conferences around the world. It also allows a not insignificant amount of money for consultants (eg. legal advice, lobbying etc.).

The association will not have an office....I really don't think that it needs one. This avoids a lot of fixed costs and overheads.

So is it financially feasible to build an association based upon these numbers? Although more work may need to be done on the financial model I believe that it does indicate that our industry can support a thriving association. It really comes back to whether the wider community buys into the vision and principles outlined in the initial articles in this series.

There are two keys to building a successful domain name association:
1.    Having a working board – there is absolutely no point in having directors that turn up and haven’t given any thought to the association since the last board meeting. Board members need to be harnessed and put to work for the people that voted them into that position.

2.    Sourcing the right CEO – There are a lot of skills that this person will need to have. Corporate governance, team building, political savvy, respect of the industry and of course an ability to inspire others to join the association. If the wrong CEO is selected then I think that trying to meet the targets will fall largely on the directors…..this may be quite hard.

I know that this article has skirted a number of issues but I believe that it provides the bones from which a good discussion can be had to add the flesh. So please don’t be shy! I’d love any suggestions that you may have and how the association can be given new life and vitality.

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Michael Gilmour has been in business for over 32 years and has both a BSC in Electronics and Computer Science and an MBA. He is the former vice-chairman of the Internet Industry Association in Australia and is in demand as a speaker at Internet conferences the world over. Michael is passionate about working with online entrepreneurs to help them navigate their new ventures around the many pitfalls that all businesses face.
Click here to arrange time with Michael

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