The Quality of Your Domains

The Quality of Your Domains

This is one of the most difficult topics to cover and it’s easy for a domain investor to throw their hands up in the air and say, “It depends on the buyer.” Although this is a true statement, it is sometimes used as an excuse for lazy thinking. Let’s begin to unpack this most difficult of topics.

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For a start, everyone will have different opinions on pricing and much of it will be tainted by their own experience. Selling a domain for a lot of money doesn’t make you a genius, it just means you’ve sold a domain. What makes you smart is if you’ve had a deliberate strategy for the sales of your domains and that strategy is unfolding in a successful outcome.

A fundamental error that many domain investors do is look at their portfolio of a thousand domains and multiply it by an average sales price of $1500 per domain. They then congratulate themselves on owning a $1.5 million-dollar asset. If this was true, then what would stop you from buying 9,000 more domains so your portfolio is now worth $15m?

The reality is that unless you have a very unusual portfolio, 90% of the domains aren’t getting any offers. If you look at your offer stream over the past 10 years (assuming you’ve been around that long) then you’ll probably discover that number is pretty close. This of course, depends on the quality of your domains…..more on this later.

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How to Sell a Domain to Your Target Market?

How to Sell a Domain to Your Target Market?

There’s a great discussion taking place over at the domain forum, NamePros, where one camp is asking why businesses don’t buy domains for thousands of dollars well another group is suggesting that is way too much money. The fundamental question that needs to be asked by a domain seller is, “Who am I selling to?”

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The vast majority of businesses in the world are small not large. These are often the family owned firms that may be running the local pizza shop or printing company. They may or may not have a website and given their clientele are within a few miles of their business they often have little need nor desire to expand to the rest of the world.

A successful small business is often one that allows the owner to pay themselves a salary. Remember that 80% of small businesses fail in the first couple of years largely due to lack of capital.

To ask a small business owner to put their hand in their own pocket and buy a domain name worth $10,000 plus dollars is a huge step. They are likely to decline the opportunity because they would rather buy a car or take their family on a holiday instead. One of the reasons why most domains sell for $1500 is because this large market has individuals within it that are prepared to risk smaller amounts of money.

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Why Are Companies Reluctant to Spend Money on a Good Domain?

Why Are Companies Reluctant to Spend Money on a Good Domain?

The last article on “Underpinning Domain Sales” sparked an interesting discussion on the domain forum, NamePros. One of the respondents asked the question, “Why are companies reluctant to spend money on a good domain?” In this article, I hope to answer that question.

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In my opinion, the dominant reason businesses don’t spend money on domain names is because of ignorance. On the whole the domain industry has not been able to mobilise itself and communicate cooperatively to businesses about the importance of domain names. I’d like to unpack this a little further.

The biggest problem has always been the question of whom should put up the PR/Marketing money to generate interest and understanding in domains. Some people point to the registries, others the registrars while others say the current domain owners should all chip in. These discussiona often degenerate into name-calling and a lot of inaction.

What domain investors need to appreciate is that once they have purchased a domain name the registries and the registrars have effectively done their job. There is NO incentive for them to try and market on behalf of existing owners to increase the demand for already registered domains so the price goes up. That’s an almost impossible job.

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Do the Domain Sales Numbers Stack Up?

Do the Domain Sales Numbers Stack Up?

I thought that I’d take a break from the series on “Building a Business” and examine what underpins the domain sales market. There are a huge number of domain investors that have bought into the market purely to sell their assets onwards…..so is this a sensible thing to do?

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In my investigation into the domain sales space I thought I’d first of all outline the two fundamental domain sales business models.

Domains as Stock Items

Stock item domains are those that sell for sub $2,500 and represent around 87% of domain sales by volume. The goal here is to move greater numbers of domains and NOT necessarily increase the sales price. The business focus is therefore to increase the stock-turn from 0.3% to say 0.6% of your domains per year….it’s all about speed and automation of transactions.

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Using Analytics to Price Domains - Part 4

Using Analytics to Price Domains - Part 4

In the last article in this series I began to unpack the importance of the demand curve for accurately pricing domain names. My experience with domain sellers is that most of them price their domains more by gut then attempting to apply a process. In this article I want to move my line of thinking forward to help sellers more accurately price their domains and buyers know if their getting a fair deal.

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I should say out the outset that I’m going to keep everything as simple as possible by minimising the number of input data points and mathematics…..but hold onto your shirt as it can still get a little tricky! Remember the goal is to see if we can create a demand curve for a market vertical and then attribute pricing to this curve. So where to start?

We can use the google keyword tool (remember there are a LOT more other data points) to provide us with both quantity and price for an individual keyword. It just so happens that the price is more often than not a reflection of the demand for that keyword due to the Google auction system amongst advertisers. Google also provides a competitive index which is really interesting and bears a lot more thought…..I won’t be applying the index for this analysis.

So I entered a whole lot of “gaming” keywords into the keyword tool and out popped the data that I was after. After a bit of manipulation, I was able to produce the following chart (price is the vertical axis and quantity the horizontal). I really haven’t added a huge number of data points but it provides a reasonable picture of demand for the gaming market vertical.

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